Blog Archives

Brazil’s First Renegade

Nelson Piquet’s childhood doesn’t reflect the cliched stories of any other champion before, or after him. He struggled to remain true to anything he was born into or achieved.  Spening much of his teen years in Miami, Florida he flourished in tennis. With modest features, squiggly teeth and an acquired sense of humor, Nelson never epitomized athleticism. He eclipsed his own talents and lost interest in the sport before turning professional. Playing on a hard court, back and fourth clearly didn’t excite the individual, and he traded cement for tarmac and a linear sport for circles.

Read the rest of this entry

F1 Grand Prix Review: Hungarian Grand Prix

Qualifying 

The standard 2015 edition of qualifying followed in Hungary this weekend with Lewis Hamilton leading the Silver Arrows duo in a one-two result. Only this time, Nico Rosberg was left behind in smoke after Lewis punched a credit in the time sheets worth half a second. At a loss for words, the German could not understand where Lewis had found such good time.

Typically following the Deutsche works team, Sebastian followed in third. Behind, the unusual candidate of Daniel Ricciardo followed in fourth. His already tired Renault engine was thankful for the shorter characteristics of the Hungaroring.

The next row was filled with Finns.  Kimi Raikkonen led his fellow countryman to fifth. Valterri Bottas shortly behind the champ is the favorite to swipe Kimi’s 2016 seat at Ferrari.

The usual suspects filled the rest of the top 10 with Daniil Kvyat, Felipe Massa, a Lotus car and finally a Toro Rosso car.

gpr103B

Read the rest of this entry

F1 Weekly Wrap Up [Week 23]

Week 23

July 6th – July 12th

WW231

Read the rest of this entry

F1 Weekly Wrap [Week 22]

Week 22

29 June – 5 July

ww221B

Read the rest of this entry

F1 Grand Prix Review: British Grand Prix

F1 Grand Prix Review: British Grand Prix

Qualifying

The cards reshuffled… Well. Slightly. Lewis Hamilton took a slightly less than convincing pole position on Saturday. Though he scored his third straight pole in Britain, Lewis could only claim this one by a mere tenth of a second from Nico Rosberg.

Over half a second down the road and filling the second row were both Williams cars, creating an almost-fairy tale effort for the racing veterans. Shortly after them came both Ferrari’s, this time in a particular order with Raikkonen leading the red front.

Red Bull slotted in with Kvyat being the shining star for the Milton Keynes bunch. He lead junior team driver Carlos Sainz to seventh.

Nico Hulkenberg claimed ninth in his “B-Spec” car. Following him came the second Red Bull of Daniel Ricciardo.

gpr94

Read the rest of this entry

F1 Weekly Wrap [Week 21]

Week 21

22 June – 28 June

ww213

Read the rest of this entry

F1 Review: Austrian Grand Prix

Austrian Grand Prix Review

Lewis Hamilton regained his rhythm after a successful weekend in Montreal. His satisfying victory seemed to cement his ways of winning again, and his determination in Austria has to be at an all-time high. But he plays it strictly cool. Nico has needed to find that “extra bit” to put the pressure on his double-champ teammate, and hasn’t quite yet made the mark he (and many others) would like him to.

Lewis Hamilton, Nico Rosberg

Read the rest of this entry

Top 12 Most Dominant Formula One Cars

Every once in a while, an F1 team produces something different. A car that is so great, it cannot even be termed competitive.They were simply to good. Some dominated for just a season, whilst others remained and were developed for years. 

Formula One is sports automated gift to mankind. Heroes from all populated continents have competed in some spectacular machinery over the years. Remarkable designers and architects of cars have bred some creative and awe-inspiring initiatives. The challenge for engineers to work their way around the rules and regulations has been a constantly fascinating journey. Some innovations were so ingenious that scrutineers failed to nullify any unwanted loopholes found by teams. Some names that have emerged over the decades have helped create Formula One into the household name it is today. Here are the top twelve most dominant cars in Formula One.

Read the rest of this entry

Scream: The end of an era

Formula 1 is indeed entertainment. It comes with a balanced romance of thrills and speed, danger and talent. However there can be an entirely separate appreciation for the noise alone that a Formula 1 engine expels.

It is easy to be thankful of lateral and vertical G-forces, cornering speeds and breaking distances, but nothing can measure against the 147db of a Formula 1 car’s drive by. Any louder and the vibrations become nearly impossible for a person to close his/her throat. Over the years, we have seen regulations change, and with that there have been deviations in the pitch and loudness of engines – each with its very own unique traits. In the 50’s drivers, engineers and fans alike were treated to the rugged, coarse sounds of a v16 BRM. Its noise was so imperfect and unrefined it was simply beautiful. One can only imagine how it could have shattered the delicate silence of British countryside all those years ago. Then came more developments in regulations which brought the shrieking sound of the v12 Ligier Matra to Formula 1’s ears during the 70’s and was a difficult benchmark tone for any engine maker to equal. Not many have been lucky enough to be graced with the prompt blare of a Ligier Matra in the flesh. Hearing driver vs. machine shifting through gears and away into the distant regions of a track is a pleasure that only a lucky handful have had the privilege to listen to. Then, during the 1980’s, we witnessed Formula 1’s first era of turbo charged cars, and with it, came its own distinctively terrifying racket. Cars reached roughly 1400 bhp during qualifying days. Twin turbo engines would have a deafening roar with flames spitting and licking the air around the rear exhausts. It was so frightening it looked almost sinister. Come 1989, the world of F1 was set to return to the pleasures and sounds of naturally aspirated engines. Fans were treated to the high pitched revving screams of the cars that would make the 90’s and the first decade of the 2000’s an infamous chapter of Formula 1.

F1 fire

Read the rest of this entry

Where Has Formula 1 Disappeared To ?

Formula One is an international sport that has touched the tarmac on every populated continent on Earth. The smell of burnt rubber and spilled fuel that once intoxicated the minds of fans in Europe, Scandinavia and Africa has been disappearing for some time now, and is feared to be lost for good unless a certain somebody (Bernie Ecclestone) does something about it.

What has happened to Formula One? Once a sport that took teams, drivers and spectators to the most exclusive F1 venues in the world, it now has a flip side. Where hosts such as France, Holland, Sweden and South Africa once held some of the most classic races on the most classic tracks that vibrated with buzzing atmospheres. Tracks were adored by spectators and respected by drivers. With long straights, fast bends and swaying chambers, the Formula 1 of yesteryear gives the sport the fantastic and heroic history it deserves. The modern era has sadly seen somewhat of a downturn. Yes, Formula 1 should spread to the far corners of the world, but do races need to be staged there? Possibly not.
246678_10151139145923150_1334288675_n.jpg

Read the rest of this entry